Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Achieving the Boston Accent: 101

Tucker: "Maaaaaaaama! I can't find the markers!"
Mags: "TUCKAH! You say it 'mahkahs', like Papa. 


My parents are here from Massachusetts. My husband says I pick my up my accent full force when one of two things happens. First is when we reach the Mass Pike on our drive back for a visit. He says, "You roll down the window to pay the toll and suddenly 'it is wicked cold he-ya.'". Second is when my parents are here visiting with us for three or more days. I jump right back into dropping my r's all over the house (which reminds me I need to vacuum).  It'll be wicked thick by the time they leave to drive back in their cah. I'm not the only one, though. I can also hear it in the kids. Secretly, I love it. Mags, having a flair for drama, really gets into it. It only lasts for a few days, but it is really cute.


So, let's do some quick Boston accent training, shall we? You know you want to.  First we will need to cross over the Mass Pike. Just drop your r's at the toll and let's go!






Ahhh, that's bettah. First and foremost, it's pronounced BAH-STON. If you need a little help getting an idea of what it should really sound like you can watch "Good Will Hunting" or go to a Red Sox game at Fenway Pahk. You can check out the Green Monstah and order a bee-ya. Bee-ya may improve your accent. 


So, in Bah-ston, we really don't all pahk the cahs in Hahvahd yahd. If I had a quarter for how many times I have been asked to say that in Northern Virginia, I could have bought myself a frappe. What is a frappe you ask? It is simply a milkshake but just sounds fancier. They are delicious.  Once you have had your frappe, you may want a drink out of a bubblah, which is a water fountain. However, any bubblahs in my book are germ ridden, so maybe you just want to buy a bottle of watah. That means you will have to go to the grocery sto-wa. In the grocery sto-wa, you fill up your carriage with groceries. While you are there, you may want to pick up some tonic. I prefer Caffeine Free Coke if you are buying.  




If they don't sell bee-ya in the grocery sto-wa, don't worry! You can always run to the packie. That's where you can buy all sorts of lick-ah.  Just ask the check out lady where the nearest one is and she'll point you in the right direction. She'll probably tell you to bank a left out of the store and it'll be right ovah the-ya. 


I am hoping you picked up dinn-ah. What are we having? Lobstah and Steamahs, of course. With watah for rinsing the steamahs off and buttah to dip them in. Lots of it. Don't forget the lobstah crack-ahs. Those contraptions make it a lot easier to crack the shell. Also, I prefer the necks to the bellies of the steamahs, so you may want to find an eating partner who likes steamah bellies. Waste not, want not.




There ya go. You're all set to visit Bah-ston. No worries. When in doubt, just throw wicked before everything you say. You'll be wicked awesome. Just keep practicing.  You'll see. It's wicked freeing, losing your r's for a few days. You could even say it's WICKED PISSAH!  


I hope you enjoy your stay! I have to go help Tuckah find the mahkahs now. 

13 comments:

  1. hahaha! Yup. My husband is from Na Hamp-sha and always makes fun of my accent! Beantown girl and proud of it! I dropped my accent a little in college but whenever I'm around my HS friends or family it ALWAYS comes right back!

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    1. Way to be proud. It's amazing how quick it returns! :P

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  2. aw your primer brings back such great memories of the 6 years i lived in boston! i'd forgotten all about the packie and also kelly's roast beef! that place is wicked good, especially after a long day at revere beach.

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    1. Kelly's is wicked good. Hope you sprayed your bangs up wicked high before you went to Reve-ah Beach. :)

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  3. Most of my college friends were from Boston and I'm going to lapse into the absorbed habit of saying "wicked" now for the rest of the day!

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    1. Ooops. Sorry Megan. Have a wicked good day!

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  4. I grew up on the Cape and my father in Scituate, so he has SUCH an accent. He was born in Bilerica and for years, we thought it was Bill Ricker and he was just pronouncing it wrong! My sisters and I mysteriously do not have accents, nor do any of our friends we grew up with. I hate the Boston accent so very, very much. And I've never said wicked in my life. My sister does and they gave her such a hard time about it when she lived in Seattle. Found you at finding the funny.

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    1. So I guess it must have been painful to read my post then. :) Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. Thanks for sharing this post. I loved it!

    No matter what we think, we all have some kind of accent. I'm from the cotton-picking, roadkill-eating, cousin-marrying deep South. New Orleans, thank God. Have some fun with THAT!

    I love hearing people from around the country. Except Fargo, North Dakota. I need to draw the line somewhere.

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    1. Thanks so much! I LOVE the southern accent. I could listen to it all day long. :)

      Little story for you:
      When I brought Chris home to "meet the parents" for the first time, it was also his first ever trip to Boston. Having his Masters in Speech and Language Pathology, he was so excited to sit and listen. He had a blast the whole trip and I was "shushed" more than once in a restaurant, so he could hear others speaking.

      Although I've lost some of it over the years, it comes back when I'm really excited about something, really nervous about something, have had more than one beverage, or am around my Boston family. :)

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  6. This makes me want to move back. *sigh*

    I'm a Jersey girl, so that's my default accent when I get back to my homeland. But I feel a definite kinship with the Mass folks. I birthed number one in Boston and have loved her (the city and the kid) evah since.

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  7. I LOVED this little accent lesson!! I am so fascinated with the way people talk. A good friend of mine is originally from North Adams (sp?) and she likes to say "wicked" still, although she has lived in Texas forever! It made me laugh to think about your husband saying you start dropping your r's (or is it "ahs"?) at the toll booth. Ha!

    (Thanks for linking up with us over at #findingthefunny this week!)

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  8. Perfect!

    I'm from Central Mass, which is even worse. I never had much of an accent, but sometimes a little "CAH-fee" comes out or something slips when I'm tipsy & mad. A friend heard me yell at the kids while we were drinking wine together via telephone, and laughed "aahhhh...you ARE a Masshole after all!"

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