Tuesday, March 13, 2012

The Final Dress Fitting

This post is in response to the Trifecta Weekday Challenge. Check out the third definition of trail (below), and respond, using the word exactly as it appears, in no less than 33 and no more than 333 words.

trail verb \ˈtrāl\

1     a:  to hang down so as to drag along or sweep the ground 
       b:  to extend over a surface in a loose or straggling manner <a vine that trails over the ground> 
       c:  to grow to such length as to droop over toward the ground

2     a:  to walk or proceed draggingly, heavily, or wearily : plod, trudge
       b:  to lag behind : do poorly in relation to others 

3:     to move, flow, or extend slowly in thin streams <smoke trailing from chimneys>



The Final Dress Fitting 

The train of silk was like an extension of steel chain behind the young woman.  It was heavier than she expected and held her back a bit. The thought of how symbolic this was crossed her mind. She didn’t think before she acted. There was no time.  All she ever heard was, “You are meant to be”.  She didn’t know anything else but this.

The seamstress eyed her up with a mouthful of pins as the soon-to-be bride awkwardly shuffled toward her. Obviously annoyed, the woman motioned for her to lift the dragging fabric off of the floor. The young woman obeyed immediately, as was her nature, and lifted it just above her calves. The cold trail of air crawled up her legs causing goose bumps and a strong shiver. The seamstress reached forth, dragged her the last two steps, and began pulling and pinching the fabric with haste. Each pin was pushed into the dress like a nail in a coffin.

“Don’t slouch. Stand up. Shoulders back.”

The young woman despised this ‘master of the pins’. She was a captive stuck in this situation feeling like she had no true options. In reality, all she had to do was say the words,


“I made a mistake. I can’t marry you.” 

She quickly dismissed  the thought away. Those words would slice him open for all the world to see. She would be the one who hurt him and she couldn’t live with that. No more than she could live with what she was about to do.

As the seamstress attacked the bodice, the young woman felt it constrict around her. The more she wriggled, the more tenacious the dress became. She tried to fight through it, to stay still, to ‘go with the flow’. Her efforts were futile. She could not stand it anymore. Suddenly, she heard herself scream,

“I can’t breathe! It doesn’t feel right. Please, I want to take it back.”

At that moment, she knew what she had to do.


23 comments:

  1. Go, girl! Excellent piece. Though ... and I'm not a marriage counselor ... I'm really not sure you should show it to Chris. :)

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    1. I just read this to Chris and we both had a good laugh. No worries, this didn't come from my experience getting ready to marry Chris.

      Thank you for the compliment, by the way. It means a lot. :)

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  2. My aunt from Louisiana has a sure cure for the jitters, but it’ll cure about ten other things too (but that’s for another day and a fever away). First you start with the blood of three Rhode Island reds… Hey where you going, you don’t have to worry I brought the chickens for you…?

    Sorry.. I had to; it was a great write. This is the third time I used this cure so I guess it's done played out. Although it does have 7 more cures.

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    1. HAHA! This is awesome Booguloo. My mother-in-law always gives me the cure of molasses mixed with vinegar. Supposedly can cure anything from sinus infection to croup. Never tried it, but she swears by it. :P Thanks for dropping by!

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  3. This was a great read. I kept hoping she would get up the courage. I love the image of the seamstress with a mouthful of pins.

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    1. Thank you so much, Kelly. That was my favorite image as well.

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  4. Damn. Love the whole piece, especially love the contrast between the word and the building of her franticness!
    I would be honored to lose to this one!

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    1. Awwww, shucks, Guapo. Thanks! I'm glad that sort of 'building' came off in the piece. That is what I was going for. Success. :P

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  5. Very intense. The build up was nicely done.

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    1. Thank so much, Tara. Can't wait to read yours!

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    1. Thank you, Sarah. I love your blog name! Very clever. :P

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  7. Really well written! The description of the seamstress was very vivid & brought back memories of my own fitting (though I was a happy bride). I think you did a great job capturing the tension between frustration & resignation.

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    1. Thank you, Amanda. I was trying to have good description and connections between what she was feeling and what was actually physically happening without being too over the top! :)

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  8. I love this! The build up was incredible and the last line felt like a relief a let out breath almost. Very good. Maybe I enjoyed it so much because I was once a reluctant bride, which by the way is no fun!

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    1. I agree. No fun at all! Thank you for your kind words!

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  9. Great story! I especially liked the comparison of pins to nails in a coffin. If she had cold feet, I could certainly see how it could be viewed that way :)

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  10. I wonder how many of us know or have known of someone who should have laid all bare. I told someone close to me the week before her wedding there was still time. She yelled at me some 10 years later that I should have said something sooner. I content it wouldn't have made a lick of difference, it always must come from within. (Trust me, she wouldn't have listened, I just couldn't live with myself for not saying so.)

    This is so well written, as others have said before me. I'm glad she knew what she had to do.

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    1. Exactly, Karen. She wouldn't have listened. I had a friend say something similar to me.

      Thank you for reading!

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  11. I think the most telling line was: "She didn't know anything else but this." Right there you've given us the foundation of her personality, and even her history.

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    1. Exactly, Christine. I am so glad that came across like I wanted it to. Thank you!

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  12. i like how the dress itself mimics her anxiety about the groom, the marriage as a whole. The chain weighing her down was a great description.

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