Monday, September 3, 2012

PLAN OF ATTACK

Tuck: "Mama. Remember my sucky?" 
Me: "I remember them well."
Tuck: *long sigh* "I miss my sucky sometimes."
Me: "That was 4 years ago we got rid of your suckies, buddy."
Tuck: "Yeah, but it still feels like yesterday."

*Suckies=Pacifiers (That's what Tuck named it when he was little.)

The conversation above broke my heart and made me have to stifle a hearty laugh all at the same time. We lived for our "suckies" in this house. We had 10 or more spread throughout the house at all times. If one was missing, no worries, we'd find it later and just use a back up. Unless, of course, it was one of their FAVORITE suckies. Then the Coast Guard, National Guard, and dogs would be called in to search the house high and low. 


When both kids had suckies, things got complicated. They were sharing and switching on me left and right. We'd put Tuck to bed with an orange sucky and go in to find him with a pink floral sucky in the morning. Fights would break out over who had whose sucky. I couldn't keep up. They were in my purse, my pockets, and every corner of the diaper bag (usually covered in Gerber teething cookie dust). They were running my life. The mood of the house began to depend on them more and more. 

That's when Chris and I called a time-out and we had the dreaded discussion about...dun dun dun...getting rid of the suckies. Honestly, I can only justify cleaning off a sucky by sticking it my mouth from the dirty restaurant floor so many times. I should have the immune system of a vulture by now.

Plus, the dentist had made a comment about seeing some impacts on Tuck's bite. It wasn't irreversible...yet. But the suckies had to go. Mags was still young and wasn't so attached. Tuck, on the other hand, was going to be a challenge. Chris and I made a plan to eradicate all suckies from our life.

In our prayers each night with the kids, we included the "babies without mommies and daddies". This was our out. We told Tuck those "babies" did not have suckies. Being a sweet, tender-hearted boy, he agreed to pack up all the suckies he had and send them to the "babies". 

We collected them all up and stuck them in an envelope. The next day, we went to the post office and sent them off to the "babies"...which really was to my dear, life-long friend, Krista. She, in turn, mailed Tuck a thank you card, stickers and a pair of his favorite type of lovey socks from the "babies". 

Overall, our plan was successful, but to be honest, the transition was brutal. The afternoon nap after we mailed them was agonizing. Tuck pleaded and cried so hard for a good 20 minutes for his sucky. 

"I didn't mean it, Mama! Go get my suckies back from 'dose' babies! Please, Mama, please!"

It was all I could do not to gather up my two toddlers and pry my way into the mailbox at the post office to retrieve the envelope of suckies. But Mags. Mags was another story. 

She was as quiet as a mouse. Not a peep. No muss, no fuss from that girl. I was so proud. But she was younger and not as attached to her sucky as Tuck. Or, so I thought. When I walked in to check on her after I finally settled her brother down, I saw that she obviously had a stash of emergency suckies somewhere in the crevices of her crib. Well played, Baby Mags, well played.

 Perhaps her brother should have taken notes.


Did your child have an attachment to a pacifier? 
If so, what was your plan of attack to rid your house of it? 
Please share with me in the comments below.


17 comments:

  1. We used the orthodontic pacifiers they gave us at the hospital. My kids used them until they were about 2 1/2 each and then just gently stopped wanting them. We never had to eradicate them, though Sam had a little trouble napping once he gave his up.

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  2. Yours experience was much more peaceful.

    Those things took over and it was my fault. It was an easy way to get the kids relaxed. I swore they multiplied like bunnies. I just found one in a box of old toys I was giving away.

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  3. I feel your pain. We let Ry have hers to long and she became incredibly attached. It brought her such comfort at nap and bed time. I look back at it now, and know I would handle her da-do situation a little differently. My Pops always made me feel better about it when he say "is it really going to make a difference when she's 16? Just let her have it." This from the man who took my squeaky! Ry still tells me every once in awhile she misses hers too. I'm over mine...I swear. ;)

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  4. My youngest was the only one attached to pacis. We prepped her that when she turned 4 the paci fairy would come and take her pacis and trade her a toy. For months she would say she hated the paci fairy and didn't want her to visit. Then one day she said "I'm ready for her to come." A week later the visit went down and she got 5 little toys in exchange for the 5 pacis under her pillow. She lamented for a little while, tried sucking her thumb which apparently did not appease her and then it was all over. It took a lot of front loading, but that paid off in the long run because it was easier than I thought it would be.

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  5. My third kid, a boy now 7, was my binky kid. Ours also multiplied like bunnies. He had a clip that had a Velcro loop on the end. It clipped to his blankie so binky was always at arms length. Till SHE came. And by she I mean his speech therapist when he was just about 2. She said they're not helping his speech or teeth, so she told us the plan: We had to trim off a slice of the suckie each night. Well, he HATED that thing after it was cut. He threw many tantrums, but it took less than a week. I would still use them. Babies gotta suck. My oldest sucked her thumb. Till second grade. And you can't cut that up.

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  6. My oldest daughter now 16 years old still sleeps with the baby doll that came home from the hospital with her. It's missing limbs and turning black. I'm afraid to wash it anymore. It might dissolve in soap. Yet she won't let it go.

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    1. One of my life-long friends still sleeps with her childhood bear. ;)

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  7. My daughter had her "foo-fie" or pacifier but now, at age 9, I cannot recall the age we weaned her from it. I don't recall there being any huge production of the last foo-fie days. She has Blue Blankie which is tattered and kinda smelly that she still sleeps with. When she was very little she carried it everywhere, but now it's just for sleeping. It's the one thing (other than her iPod Touch) that MUST travel between mom's & dad's houses.

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  8. Great story. The picture of Mags at the end is absolutely PRICELESS. Soooooo funny!

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  9. Go Tuck for wanting to give them to those in need, even at that young age!

    So how is weaning Mags off them going?

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    1. Haha! Guap, she weaned that night after I found all her hidden pacifiers. :)

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  11. We did not have pacifiers but we did have blankie(s). As we approached his 4th birthday we talked about giving them to babies that did not have blankies. He was the one that said when he was 4 he was going to be too big for them. On the morning of his 4th birthday the blankie fairy came and took them and left an Imagination Movers concert tour poster and lanyard in their place.

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  12. Too cute! My oldest had a pacifier that as he approached three he was biting. I let it go, and it had holes in it. It wasn't very good to suck anymore, and one day he said with a big sigh, "I think it's time to give this up." My other binky kid lost his right before we went out of town one weekend, and he was okay. Even though I found it when we got back home, I threw it away. I had two thumb suckers - one had surgery on his mouth when he was one and had to wear arm splints to prevent him putting his hands in his mouth. That cured him of it. My almost five-year-old will still suck his thumb when he is tired. And my one year old is neither a binky nor a thumb kid. He only wants mama. That one is proving to be the hardest habit to break!

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  13. Em was so attached to her "foofoo" that I thought we'd never be rid of them. I even put on an old winter coat last year, stuck my hand in the pocked, and pulled out... a foofoo. That's going into her keep forever box. :)

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  14. LOL. Now, that's a clever kid! I love how she's sleeping with her legs crossed like "Just chillin with my secret sucky. No biggie."

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  15. Oh my goodness, this brought back memories. My oldest had a paci until she was nearly 4. The dr. said "Well, you only have like 2 or 3 left, right?" I said yes. Because 24 is totally the same as 'like, 2 or 3', right?

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